Boris

Portrait of Boris

Boris

"I love the challenge of passing on my enthusiasm for the subject to museum visitors who are encountering it for the first time"

Boris started at the museum doing part-time casual work, moving boxes from one room to another. He is now studying History and Philosophy of Science at university, finding out more about the kinds of objects we have here.

After leaving school I was a bit short of ideas about my career, so when I was offered a job at the Whipple Museum I was happy to take it.

Being so close to all the objects was what I found particularly interesting. Some of them are hundreds of years old, some are very intricate, some very beautiful, and some have fascinating stories behind them.

For example, one of the objects in the museum is a six-foot speaking trumpet made around 1660, which was used to communicate between ships. Another is a sheet of paper covered with notes by Isaac Newton [http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/newton_isaac.shtml].

It wasn't long before I moved on from just being interested in the objects. I'd accidentally stumbled across a whole subject, the history of science. I realised I'd already learned a lot of facts, too.

I began to do my own research into the collection. After that, going to university seemed like the best way to carry on doing what I enjoyed. So I did some further study - an extra A-level, in Philosophy - then applied to do History and Philosophy of Science at university in Leeds, and got a place there.

But although I'm now studying full-time, I haven't stopped working in museums. I spend some of my holidays back at the Whipple: doing photography, writing labels, dealing with enquiries, and so on. As for my career, my experience has so far led to an internship at the National Maritime Museum [http://www.nmm.ac.uk/] in London, and also plenty of work on the object collections at university.

There's no end to the fascinating stories about objects from the past, and the weird and curious characters you meet ensure that the work is always engaging. I love the challenge of passing on my enthusiasm for the subject to museum visitors who are encountering it for the first time.

Activity links: Boris helped out on the map screen, and had info about the armillary sphere and binocular microscope on the phone.

 
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